Can an extrovert dating an introvert

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The good news is, you don't have to go into a breakup completely blind, and with a little strategic planning, you'll be ready to find your voice and do what you want.

And keep in mind that these strategies are definitely useful for introverts in new relationships, too, Chlipala says.

I am not getting the same social pleasure in return though.

We have discussed whether this is a trust issue, and she responded with a hard “NO.” And I do believe her.

I am truly moved every time I hear from an extrovert who says, “I am trying to respect my partner’s need for solitude (or less socializing or quiet time).” Your effort and thoughtfulness is exactly right. But maybe if you ask some questions, you’ll start figuring out the middle ground to get both of your needs met.

Being respectful of your partner’s needs, however, does not let to say sometimes, “It’s important to me that you come to this party,” or, “I understand that you need solitude, but it’s not OK with me for you to spend every evening alone in your man cave. Perhaps you need to go to big parties alone or with friends, but your partner is OK with small dinner gatherings.

Here are 5 things extroverts can consider when dating introverts (or hoping to): 1. After a lifetime of feeling like they were deeply flawed—and I recently received an email from a woman in her 70s—introverts are exuberant to learn that they’re just fine. For some, it’s a celebration and a venting of frustration and anger.

Are you an introvert dating or married to an extrovert? One extrovert I interviewed for my book, “QUIET: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking,” described her introverted husband as “the anchor of her world.” Extroverts report that introverts give them permission to explore their serious, introspective sides.

Many successful couples are introvert-extrovert pairs. The two types are often drawn to each other out of a sense of mutual delight.

Negotiate in advance the amount of socializing you’ll do as a couple on any given weekend, month, or year. That way, you don’t have to argue about it night after night.

In my book, I tell the story of a husband who wanted to host a dinner party every Friday night, and a wife who hated giving parties.

She will beg, plead, and fight with me not to go out after work for a drink with friends, play in a coed softball league, or do pretty much anything that involves my co-workers, friends that she doesn’t know, and other females.

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