Measure isotopes for radiometric dating

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For humans, the steady movement of the hands on a clock marks off the seconds and the hours.

Many isotopes have been studied, probing a wide range of time scales.The rates of decay of various radioactive isotopes have been accurately measured in the laboratory and have been shown to be constant, even in extreme temperatures and pressures.These rates are usually expressed as the isotope's half-life--that is, the time it takes for one-half of the parent isotopes to decay.Prior to 1905 the best and most accepted age of the Earth was that proposed by Lord Kelvin based on the amount of time necessary for the Earth to cool to its present temperature from a completely liquid state.Although we now recognize lots of problems with that calculation, the age of 25 my was accepted by most physicists, but considered too short by most geologists. Recognition that radioactive decay of atoms occurs in the Earth was important in two respects: Principles of Radiometric Dating Radioactive decay is described in terms of the probability that a constituent particle of the nucleus of an atom will escape through the potential (Energy) barrier which bonds them to the nucleus.Scientists determined the Earth's age using a technique called radiometric dating.

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